Since FIFA President Sepp Blatter announced that Qatar would host the 2022 World Cup nearly 2 years ago there has been increasing pressure on the body to rethink their decision. With the tournament still 9 years away, the football world is throwing a tantrum and it seems that some of FIFA’s members are becoming more outspoken about their disapproval of the tiny Gulf state as host.

When Blatter made the announcement in Zurich the jubilation of the Qatar bid team who had travelled to Switzerland was similar to that of a jackpot winner at The rest of the massive conference hall was silent for a moment before voicing their shock and exasperation at the decision, but it seemed that there was no going back. However, now it seems there are more rumblings about the suitability of the event in a location that has a blistering hot summer totally unsuited to the sport.

FIFA Executive Committee member Theo Zwanziger has waded into the fray, calling the Qatar World Cup a blatant mistake. He says that even moving the date of the cup wouldn’t be ideal as although it may help players avoid the searing summer heat it would seriously affect the European Leagues. Sepp Blatter proposed the switch of the tournament to the cooler months, saying that the World Cup is a party for the people and although you can cool stadiums down, you cannot cool down a whole country. The summer heat regularly tops 100 degrees and should never have been considered a viable option for the cup in the first place. Blatter’s proposal was met with disdain and Zwanziger insists the event should be given to someone else.

Other high profile figures have also recently expressed their opposition over the tournament being hosted by Qatar, with UEFA President Michael Platini saying it was impossible to play football in Qatar and another member of the FIFA Executive Committee, Franz Beckenbauer being adamant about providing an alternative solution. CEO of the Premier League, Richard Scudamore has also expressed his unhappiness, saying that the change of event date would disrupt the league and that summer is the right time, with good reason.

There is no doubt that a cloud hangs over the 2022 World Cup in Qatar and  the decision that looked set in stone might now be crumbling.

category: Uncategorized
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There is something going on in the French Ligue 1, which has previously received less attention in comparison to other top European football leagues.

Paris Saint-Germain for instance has just spent €64 million to buy Napoli striker Edinson Cavani. This is the highest amount that has ever been payed for a transfer within the French League. Thanks to its rich Qatari owner PSG has made it from finishing 16th in 2008 to win Ligue 1 this year. No doubt that money had a significant impact on this outcome. This high-buying definitely increases the reputation of the French football league on the one side but on the other side clubs like Marseille or Nice will have problems to compete. We can wait in suspense for their performance next season and use the free Unibet promotional code.

However there is another club that draws the attention of the media lately – it’s AS Monaco. Owned by Dmitry Rybolovlev, a rich Russian businessmen, the club is going for top players this transfer window. Despite strong interest from Manchester United, Chelsea and Real Madrid Rybolovlev managed to get the Columbian striker Radamel Falcao for over £50 million. Altogether the Russian billionaire has already spent £100 million to reach his goal to build a new football empire and has also signed other players like Ricardo Carvalho, Jeremy Toulalan and the Porto duo Joao Moutinho and James Rodrigue.. Taking into account these facts AS Monaco might be an equal competitor of Paris Saint-Germain next season.

category: World Cup 2014
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In the United States, there’s an ongoing conversation about whether or not the national football (or in their words, soccer) team can compete with the best international sides. The truth is, for some time now, the USA has been a middle-of-the-pack team in international football competition. Most European football fans hardly give the USA a second thought. However, a number of factors and developments in the past year have turned it into a real question: can the Yanks sustain their recent good play and become a consistent, quality international competitor?

Let’s be clear: there’s no need to sign in to Bet Fair and put money on the United States winning a World Cup any time soon. But things are headed in the right direction for the Americans. Here are a few specific indications that the upward trend may continue.

The Winning Streak
What’s big news in the U.S. right now has begun to grab some international attention, and perhaps for good reason. The numbers tell it all: in the past 12 international matches, the Yanks are 10-1-1, including a draw in Mexico City – a notoriously hostile environment for visiting teams. Within that record, Team USA has now won an impressive 9 straight. They may not be defeating the likes of Spain and Germany just yet, but when you get to 9 straight, it’s a positive sign no matter which teams you’re playing.

Jurgen Klinsmann’s Success
Earlier this year, frustration with former German star and current U.S. coach Jurgen Klinsmann was mounting, to the point that a single scathing article generated a great deal of attention, and even some calls for a new coach. Since then, however, Klinsmann’s handling of the team has been masterful. Even benching Landon Donovan, the face of U.S. soccer, seemed to pay off in June, and it now seems as if Klinsmann has built a national team structure that can compete consistently.

Roster Depth
Part of Klinsmann’s success has been in manipulating rosters in a way that has kept the team winning, but also integrated new players. Jozy Altidore, Landon Donovan and Clint Dempsey may get the most attention, but meanwhile the likes of Chris Wondolowski and Eddie Johnson are making significant impacts. The U.S. has gone from a scrappy but imperfect team to a tiered system with options and firepower.

International Success
It’s long been thought that the top players for the U.S. don’t get enough experience in top international leagues to compete well in team international competition. This is beginning to change, slowly but surely. Jozy Altidore has just become a promising new signee for Sunderland, Michael Bradley has done well with Roma, and Dempsey is leading the way with Tottenham Hotspur. The experience seems to be paying off.